1/9/2022

Fl Studio Vs Logic For Mac

I'm currently on a PC (XP) and jumping head first into the Mac world SOON. Basically SICK of PCs. Anyway, I use FL Studio softare to create music and I was wondering if Logic Pro even compares to FL Studio in anyway. If it doesn't, then I guess I would be forced to. And FL Studio, which has that Garageband 'just do a cannonball into the deep end of the pool' approachability factor. But their Mac version is currently the Windows version with a wrapper, so you're not going to get the kind of performance you'd get from a native app. Lots of people love it, though. Logic is an Apple product and is available only to Mac users. If you are a Windows user then your automatic choice would be to buy FL studio. If you are a Mac user you can buy either of the two as both these software are available on the Mac platform. Logic Pro FL Studio, formerly named Fruity Loops, is a music software environment for music production, remixes, and creating new sounds. Logic Pro is Apple’s creation integrates with other music programs, such as Garageband, as well as other Apple software programs. Sep 09, 2008 I would say that Logic is just as capable in electronic production as FL, only difference being the workflow while (ime) FL was just really shitty to record in. Logic also comes with a bunch of great synths and sampled instruments (that in my opinion surpasses those of FL Studio).

GarageBand

There’s been a seismic shift in how records are made. Now, you can do it with the built-in software that comes with every Apple computer, thanks to the free GarageBand. Unlike the cartoonish version that debuted in the early aughts, the new GarageBand features a surprisingly serious presentation that roughly mirrors the high-end Logic Pro X digital audio workstation, or DAW. Although GarageBand lacks Logic’s amazing flexibility, vast array of instruments, and powerful mixing and mastering features, it’s almost as powerful when it comes to handling other tasks. The fact that GarageBand is free makes the app all the better, and a clear Editors’ Choice for entry-level recording software.

Setup and User Interface


GarageBand’s basic interface layout mimics that of Logic Pro X and other proper multitrack software. Selecting one brings up the main interface. The top-right portion of the window is where you add and mix new tracks. You click any recorded data to bring up an editor in the bottom portion of the display. Here you can switch between piano roll and score views, an audio editor, and, where appropriate, an EQ tab that displays a beautiful, clean-sounding parametric equalizer for the given track.

The left side of the display shows your selected instrument. The top bar includes icons for triggering the various windows, a transport bar for recording and playback, an LED-style readout for the current beat, bar, tempo, meter, and other information, icons for loop recording, a guitar tuner, a count off, and a metronome. It’s easy to resize the various windows and zoom levels using the on-screen sliders. To the far right, you can launch a Notes page, an audio loop browser, and a media drawer for recorded audio and movies you want to sync music to. Apple also added support for the Force Touch trackpad and Touch Bar that come built into the latest MacBook Pros.

Recording, Smart Controls, and Remote

Recording is as simple as arming a track and clicking the Record icon. You can record at 24 bits with a mic, if you have a USB-powered one or an audio interface with a mic preamp into which you can plug a microphone. You can record and mix up to 255 tracks, and only your audio interface limits how many you can record simultaneously. Basic editing is simple, but if you want to really dig into GarageBand, advanced features are available, too. Flex Time lets you massage the groove of a given audio track, while Groove Matching perfectly matches the timing, tempo, and feel of the other tracks to the one you have set up. These are surprisingly transparent sounding, as long as you use them within reason.

There’s still no proper mixing board. Instead, you use the left side of the Arrangement window as a mixer, with horizontal sliders on each track. There’s a reverb effect, and you can pan tracks from left to right in the stereo field; you can also apply compression to recorded audio tracks. GarageBand includes a basic mastering track to boost your levels and get a finished sound, though it’s nothing like what you’d get in a professional-level digital audio workstation, such as Logic Pro X or Pro Tools. Still, it’s a much-appreciated inclusion in a free recording app.

PROS

  • Streamlined, professional interface.
  • Makes it easy to record and mix music.
  • Apple’s built-in sound and loop library keeps getting bigger and better.
  • Enjoyable instrument lessons, including now-free artist lessons.
  • Supports 24-bit recording and third-party plug-ins.

CONS

  • No mixing console view.

FL Studio

Image-Line’s FL Studio, known affectionately by long-term fans as FruityLoops (the app’s original name, when it debuted in 1998), has matured into a powerful digital audio workstation (DAW). While it’s still clearly geared for electronic music production “in the box,” as opposed to recording live musicians playing acoustic instruments, you can record or create just about any kind of audio project with it. And now, for the first time, Mac users can also join in on the fun. If your memory of FL Studio is closer to its roots—when the Belgian company’s audio editing app looked more like a 1980s Amiga tracker than a proper DAW—prepare to be amazed at how far the program has come.

Setup and User Interface

FL Studio’s vector-based is sharp and easy to read despite its complexity, especially on Retina-class monitors. The UI is fully scalable, even across multiple displays. It also supports multitouch; with an appropriate touch-screen monitor on a PC, you can use it like a live physical mixing board and move multiple faders simultaneously.

Starting from the left side, the Browser contains all of your presets, instruments, audio clips, project files, and other assorted material to work with. The Channel Rack contains whatever sound generators are in use in the current project. The Pattern list shows all of the clips in use. The Playlist serves as the main arranging window, and looks a lot like the view in other DAWs. You can also bring up the piano roll and step sequencer, both of which let you edit more closely. The mixing console and meter bridge view can be set to multiple sizes. You can adjust the borders of or hide any of these windows as you see fit. If you’re used to a much earlier version of FL Studio, prepare to get reoriented; a number of main pieces like the Channel Rack and Pattern Menus have been moved around.

For the first time, FL Studio supports time signatures—you’re not just constrained to 4/4 anymore. You can set time signatures for both patterns and the playlist, and you can play multiple time signatures on top of each other.

Recording, Smart Controls, and Remote

The way each project works is as a collection of patterns—beginning with Pattern 1, which you can find underneath the transport. You can start a song just by clicking on the 16th-note step sequencer buttons to lay down notes, or by right-clicking the channel and choosing Fill in Steps to speed up the process. To add a new sound, select Plugin Preset > Generator, and drag the one you want into the Channel Rack, either over an existing channel or after adding a new one first.

To record from a MIDI keyboard instead, click the Record button, and then choose Everything at the bottom of the dialog box asking what you want to record. When you’re done, CTRL-Q quantizes the notes you recorded in that pattern. As you create new patterns, you drop them into the Playlist, where you can then duplicate them, or zap them with the right button if you change your mind. It’s easy to cut and paste notes, drag them around, adjust their size, and so on; the pattern automatically lengthens and snaps to make building longer ones a quick process. As you work, you can alternate between Song mode, to hear everything, or Pattern mode, to focus on and develop individual patterns.

Most of this is easy enough to grasp, but there are a few odd interface conventions. For example, don’t be fooled by the single Undo and Redo options in the Edit menu drop down; the real undo history is hidden in the Browser, or you can bring it up by hitting CTRL-ALT-Z. And while the interface contains a lot of small, obscure icons, no tool tips seem to appear when you hover over them. Instead, look up and to the top left, where a small window displays the purpose of each element of the interface as you pass the cursor over it. There’s no score editor, so you’ll need something else if you prefer working with music notation.

PROS

  • Brilliant loop and pattern-based MIDI composition tools.
  • Visible automation clips are easy to manipulate.
  • Free lifetime updates.
  • There’s finally a Mac version!

CONS

  • Convoluted, inflexible audio recording (in higher-priced versions).
  • Must manually assign instrument tracks to mixer channels.
  • Built-in sound library could use some updating.
  • Lacks notation editor.

Check the price here – Amazon

Conclusions

While there are some clear limitations, you can produce exceptional work using just FL Studio. The preloaded demo song sounds every bit as polished and engaging as you’d expect from a finished master, and it’s created entirely within FL Studio. There are dozens of such demo tracks included; stepping through them is a great way to learn what’s possible with the program, and you can break each one down by its individual pieces to get your own ideas for sounds.

I enjoy the freedom of linear open tracks and unlimited hard drive storage we have today. As a result, I don’t personally take to an environment like FL Studio, which is largely pattern- and loop-oriented (and I felt this way about Ableton Live as well when I tested that program, so read into this what you will). The obvious difference is while you’re still creating patterns like we did back then, the process in FL Studio is visual and flexible in a way it never was with lists of numbers in tiny two-line LCDs, my original point of reference for pattern-based recording. Starting out today with something like FL Studio, you could easily become a natural with the technique.

Even so, FL Studio still feels like a better fit for producing contemporary EDM and hip-hop. While you can use it to record and mix linear audio tracks from, say, a singer/songwriter, or in a rock band context, it’s not FL Studio’s core mission. Of the available packages, FL Studio Producer is probably the best value; at $199 it undercuts both Ableton Live and Propellerhead Reason. FL Studio Producer is flexible enough to get everything you need to be done for in-the-box composition, and without unnecessary restrictions on vocal clip recording or sample editing that the base version brings. If you’ve got the money, by all means, spring for Signature or All Plugins, though you may want to put that cash toward some third-party virtual instruments instead.

Ridiculously powerful. Seriously creative.

Live LoopsFor spontaneous composition.

Live Loops is a dynamic way to create and arrange music in real time. Kick off your composition by adding loops, samples, or your recorded performances into a grid of cells. Trigger different cells to play with your ideas without worrying about a timeline or arrangement. Once you find combinations that work well together you can create song sections, then move everything into the Tracks area to continue production and finish your song.

Remix FX

Bring DJ-style effects and transitions to an individual track or an entire mix with a collection of stutters, echoes, filters, and gating effects.

Logic Remote

Control features like Live Loops, Remix FX, and more from your iPad or iPhone using Multi-Touch gestures.

Novation Launchpad

Live Loops supports Launchpad for a tactile experience. Use an 8x8 grid of colorful and expressive pads to dynamically trigger cells, input notes, adjust mixer levels and more.

Step SequencerPure beat poetry.

Step Sequencer is inspired by classic drum machines and synthesizers. Using the Step Sequence editor, quickly build drum beats, bass lines, and melodic parts — and even automate your favorite plug-ins. Add sophisticated variations to your pattern with a wide range of creative playback behaviors. Use Note Repeat to create rolling steps, Chance to randomize step playback, and Tie Steps Together to create longer notes.

Logic RemoteTouch and flow.

Logic Remote lets you use your iPhone or iPad to control Logic Pro on your Mac. Use Multi-Touch gestures to play software instruments, mix tracks, and control features like Live Loops and Remix FX from anywhere in the room. Swipe and tap to trigger cells in Live Loops. And tilt your iPhone or iPad up and down and use its gyroscope to manipulate filters and repeaters in Remix FX.

New

Sequence your beats

Program drum patterns and melodic parts from your iPad or iPhone. Create dynamic rhythmic performances, and automate your plug-ins — all with a quick tap of your finger.

Multi-Touch mixing

Control your mix from wherever you are in the room — whether that’s next to your computer or on the couch — with Multi-Touch faders.

Pair and play

Use a variety of onscreen instruments, such as keyboards, guitars, and drum pads, to play any software instrument in Logic Pro from your iPad or iPhone.

Key commands

Logic Studio For Windows

Create at the speed of sound with key commands in Logic Remote. Choose from curated commands for popular workflows, or create your own custom set.

Sampler

We redesigned and improved our most popular plug-in — the EXS24 Sampler — and renamed it Sampler. The new single-window design makes it easier to create and edit sampler instruments while remaining backward compatible with all EXS24 files. An expanded synthesis section with sound-shaping controls brings more depth and dynamics to your instruments. The reimagined mapping editor adds powerful, time-saving features that speed the creation of complex instruments. Use the zone waveform editor to make precise edits to sample start/end, loop ranges, and crossfades. And save hours of tedious editing with new drag-and-drop hot zones.

Quick Sampler

Quick Sampler is a fast and easy way to work with a single sample. Drag and drop an audio file from the Finder, Voice Memos, or anywhere within Logic Pro. Or record audio directly into Quick Sampler using a turntable, microphone, musical instrument, or even channel strips playing in Logic Pro. In a few steps, you can transform an individual sample into a fully playable instrument. And with Slice Mode, you can split a single sample into multiple slices — perfect for chopping up vocals or breaking up and resequencing drum loops.

Drum Synth

Studio

This powerful but easy-to-use plug-in creates synthesized drum sounds. Choose from a diverse collection of drum models and shape their sound with up to eight simple controls. Drum Synth is also directly integrated into the bottom of the Drum Machine Designer interface — giving you a focused set of sound-shaping controls.

Drum Machine Designer

Redesigned to be more intuitive and integrated, Drum Machine Designer lets you effortlessly build electronic drum kits. Apply individual effects and plug-ins on each discrete drum pad to experiment with sound design and beat-making in new ways. You can also create a unique layered sound by assigning the same trigger note to two different pads. To help you quickly edit sounds, Quick Sampler and Drum Synth are directly integrated into the Drum Machine Designer interface.

DrummerCompose to the beat of a different percussionist.

Using Drummer is like hiring a session drummer or collaborating with a highly skilled beat programmer. Create organic-sounding acoustic drum tracks or electronic beats with the intelligent technology of Drummer. Choose from dozens of drummers who each play in a different musical genre, and direct their performances using simple controls.

Compositions and PerformancesYour studio is always in session.

Logic Pro turns your Mac into a professional recording studio able to handle even the most demanding projects. Capture your compositions and performances — from tracking a live band to a solo software-instrument session — and flow them into your songs.

The ultimate way to record.

Seamless punch recording. Automatic take management. Support for pristine 24-bit/192kHz audio. Logic Pro makes it all easy to do — and undo. You can create projects with up to 1000 stereo or surround audio tracks and up to 1000 software instrument tracks, and run hundreds of plug-ins. It’s all you need to complete any project.

Get the most out of MIDI.

Logic Pro goes beyond the average sequencer with an advanced set of options that let you record, edit, and manipulate MIDI performances. Transform a loose performance into one that locks tight into the groove using region-based parameters for note velocity, timing, and dynamics. Or tighten up your MIDI performances while preserving musical details like flams or chord rolls with Smart Quantize.

Industry-leading tools

As your song develops, Logic Pro helps organize all your ideas and select the best ones. Group related tracks, audition alternate versions, and consolidate multiple tracks. Lightning-fast click-and-drag comping helps you build your best performance from multiple takes.

Smart Tempo

Go off-script and stay on beat with Smart Tempo, a way to effortlessly mix and match music and beats without worrying about the original tempo. Record freely without a click track. And easily combine and edit MIDI and audio tracks — from vinyl samples to live instruments to multitrack audio stems — with constant or variable tempo.

Flex Time

Quickly manipulate the timing and tempo of your recording with Flex Time. Easily move the individual beats within a waveform to correct drum, vocal, guitar, or any other kind of track without slicing and moving regions.

Flex Pitch

Edit the level and pitch of individual notes quickly and easily with Flex Pitch. Roll over any note and all parameters are available for tweaking.

Track Alternatives

Create alternate versions of a track or multiple grouped tracks, and switch between them at any time to audition different options. Create, store, and select from different edits and arrangements of track regions to make it easier to experiment with various creative ideas.

Takes and Quick Swipe Comping

Click and drag to choose the best sections of each take to create a seamless comp, complete with transition-smoothing crossfades. Save multiple comps and switch among them to pick the one you like best.

Track Stacks

Fl Studio Vs Logic For Mac Download

Consolidate multiple related tracks into a single track. Use a Summing Stack as a quick way to create submixes. Or create layered and split instruments.

Project Alternatives

Create as many alternate versions of a project as you’d like, each with its own name and settings but sharing the same assets — efficiently saving storage space. Load any version to make changes without compromising your original.

Track Groups and VCA Faders

Manage large mixes with Track Groups and VCA faders. Assign any selection of channels to a track group, then control the levels or other parameters of all tracks in the group from any single channel in the group.

Automation

Easily capture changes to any channel strip or plug-in parameter. Just enable automation, press Play, and make your changes.

Even more pro features in the mix.

Logic Pro is packed with incredible tools and resources to enhance your creativity and workflow as you sharpen your craft — even if you’re a seasoned pro.

Graduate from GarageBand.

Fl Studio Vs Logic For Mac Pro

Logic Remote. Touch and flow.

Fl Studio Vs Logic For Mac Download

MainStage

Sound as great onstage as you do in the studio.

Fl Studio 12 For Mac

Education Bundle

Five amazing apps. One powerful collection.